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NCAR developed and Vaisala commercialized the dropsonde, a meteorological instrument that is deployed from an aircraft into hurricanes to improve both track and intensity forecasts

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Wednesday, February 13, 2013
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The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) today announced the first step in the development of a Cybersecurity Framework, which will be a set of voluntary standards and best practices to guide industry in reducing cyber risks to the networks and computers that are vital to the nation’s economy, security and daily life.

Vaisala introduces a new family of humidity and temperature transmitters for the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning industry. Combining top quality with affordable price, the versatile Vaisala INTERCAP® Humidity and Temperature Transmitter Series HMDW80 is the complete set for collecting the basic humidity and temperature information needed for a variety of HVAC applications.

The new transmitters are optimized for reliable operation and easy installation with very little maintenance. The excellent stability of the INTERCAP® sensor ensures reliable measurement with minimal maintenance, and if needed, the sensor can be easily exchanged on location with practically no downtime at all.

UCAR/NCAR David Hosansky
January 29th, 2013

 

BOULDER--Even if you live more than 1,000 miles from the nearest large city, it could be affecting your weather.

In a new study that shows the extent to which human activities are influencing the atmosphere, scientists have concluded that the heat generated by everyday activities in metropolitan areas alters the character of the jet stream and other major atmospheric systems. This affects temperatures across thousands of miles, significantly warming some areas and cooling others, according to the study this week in Nature Climate Change.

David J. Wineland, a physicist at the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), has won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics. The honor is NIST’s fourth Nobel prize in physics in the past 15 years.

Wineland shared the prize with Serge Haroche of the Collège de France and Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, France. In announcing the winners today, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences cited Wineland and Haroche "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems."

A new website has been launched by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to serve as a central resource for technology transfer plans developed by agencies with federal research laboratories.

The original chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) developed by NIST researchers, shown here, began with in-house development of a miniature all-optical clock. This invention has been developed commercially into a chip-scale package that remarkably improves performance and functionality of low-power navigation devices, improvised explosive device (IED) jammers and other applications.