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NCAR developed and Vaisala commercialized the dropsonde, a meteorological instrument that is deployed from an aircraft into hurricanes to improve both track and intensity forecasts

News & Events

UCAR/NCAR David Hosansky
January 29th, 2013

 

BOULDER--Even if you live more than 1,000 miles from the nearest large city, it could be affecting your weather.

In a new study that shows the extent to which human activities are influencing the atmosphere, scientists have concluded that the heat generated by everyday activities in metropolitan areas alters the character of the jet stream and other major atmospheric systems. This affects temperatures across thousands of miles, significantly warming some areas and cooling others, according to the study this week in Nature Climate Change.

David J. Wineland, a physicist at the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), has won the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics. The honor is NIST’s fourth Nobel prize in physics in the past 15 years.

Wineland shared the prize with Serge Haroche of the Collège de France and Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, France. In announcing the winners today, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences cited Wineland and Haroche "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems."

A new website has been launched by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to serve as a central resource for technology transfer plans developed by agencies with federal research laboratories.

The original chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) developed by NIST researchers, shown here, began with in-house development of a miniature all-optical clock. This invention has been developed commercially into a chip-scale package that remarkably improves performance and functionality of low-power navigation devices, improvised explosive device (IED) jammers and other applications.

NOAA today announced the winners of its recent competition for education grants that will allow thousands of K-12 students around the country to get outside and participate in hands-on environmental education opportunities. A total of 59 projects will benefit from $5.5 million in grants from the NOAA Office of Education’s Bay-Watershed Education and Training (B-WET) Program that will support activities ranging from data driven field investigations in the Pacific Northwest to studies of storm water management and invasive species in the Great Lakes.

All recipients of B-WET grants emphasize meaningful watershed educational experiences — sustained, hands-on activities that are aligned with academic learning standards and responsive to regional education and environmental priorities. Some 2012 student activities include learning about currents and marine debris on the coast of Hawaii with the Malama Kai Foundation, participating in field investigations in the Gulf of Mexico with the University of Texas, and developing urban schoolyard habitats with the Living Classrooms Foundation in Chesapeake Bay.

Steve Cundiff will receive a Silver Medal from the U. S. Department of Commerce for his leadership of JILA’s X-Wing project at an award ceremony to be held in Washington, D. C. on January 8, 2013. He is also being honored for this achievement during the 40th annual NIST Awards Ceremony at NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland on December 5, 2012.

JILA is the joint research institute between NIST and the University of Colorado, Boulder. For 50 years, JILA has been a world leader in measurement science research and education of scientists who have become leaders in metrology, innovation, education, and national policy. Before Cundiff was able to secure support for the new building, JILA’s aging facilities were increasingly unable to provide the control of vibration, temperature, humidity, and air cleanliness required for a world-class research and measurement science.