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NCAR developed and Vaisala commercialized the dropsonde, a meteorological instrument that is deployed from an aircraft into hurricanes to improve both track and intensity forecasts

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The International Symposium on Advanced Radio Technologies (ISART) is a US government-sponsored conference that brings together government, academia, and industry leaders for the purpose of collaborating on groundbreaking developments and applications of advanced radio technologies. ISART 2016 is the 15th in the series of high quality symposia bringing together the world's experts on advanced radio systems development, happening August 1-3, 2016 in Westminster, Colorado.

The theme of ISART 2016 is spectrum forensics, that is, spectrum measurements that support interference monitoring, investigation, and enforcement.  As more and more spectrum users are pressed to operate in shared bands, effective spectrum sharing will require an entirely new legal and regulatory environment, as well as sophisticated technologies that can reliably thread the three parameters of time, frequency, and location to deliver acceptable service in shared bands without interfering with other users of the same or adjacent bands.  Spectrum forensics will help build and maintain good fences to make good neighbors. 

NOAA’s first space weather satellite, DSCOVR, has completed instrument validation and will go operational on July 27, when it will take over the role of monitoring potentially damaging space weather storms as they approach Earth. DSCOVR, which stands for Deep Space Climate Observatory, brings improved measurements and higher quality data than currently available, giving forecasters better information with which to issue critical space weather warnings and alerts.

“Even though the sun is 93 million miles away, activity on the surface of the sun can have significant impacts here on Earth,” said Tom Berger, director of NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center. “Severe space weather can disrupt power grids, marine and aviation navigation, satellite operations, GPS systems and communication technologies. DSCOVR will allow us to deliver more  timely, accurate, and actionable geomagnetic storm warnings, giving people time to prevent damage and disruption of important technological systems.”

NREL has issued its annual open call for requests to use the lab's high-performance computing (HPC) resources. NREL provides HPC and related capabilities to support the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Research and development projects that are funded by EERE offices or aligned with the EERE mission are eligible to use these resources.

On behalf of EERE, NREL coordinates the allocation of its HPC resources each fiscal year. For fiscal year 2017 (FY17), the allocation period runs November 1, 2016, through October 31, 2017. Allocation requests are due August 1, 2016. Resources to be allocated include approximately 21 million node hours (nodes have 16 or 24 cores), 750 terabytes of shared data storage, and up to 1 petabyte of long-term data storage.

Richard Leonard is a corporate turnaround artist. And the National Science Foundation (NSF) in Arlington, Virginia, is betting on him to turn around its troubled National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). Last summer, faced with a projected $80 million cost overrun and a year’s delay in the scheduled 2016 completion, NSF decided to shrink the number of NEON sites from more than 100 to 81 and reduce the scope of the project. That was the final straw in a series of missteps that sealed the fate of the previous contractor, NEON Inc., which was created for the purpose of building and running the observatories.

NSF has given Battelle until mid-June to submit a detailed plan for managing NEON, but Leonard says there won’t be any major surprises. “I do not expect to see any descoping beyond what has already been announced,” Leonard says, “and we’re looking for completion by the end of 2017.”

EarthCube, a landmark initiative to develop new technological and computational capabilities for geosciences research, will be supported by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) under a new agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Created by NSF in 2011, EarthCube aims to help researchers across the geosciences from meteorology to seismology better understand our planet in ways that can strengthen societal resilience to natural events. More than 2,500 EarthCube contributors – including scientists, educators, and information professionals – work together on the creation of a common cyberinfrastructure for researchers to collect, access, analyze, share, and visualize all forms of data and related resources.