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NCAR developed and Vaisala commercialized the dropsonde, a meteorological instrument that is deployed from an aircraft into hurricanes to improve both track and intensity forecasts

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NREL has issued its annual open call for requests to use the lab's high-performance computing (HPC) resources. NREL provides HPC and related capabilities to support the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Research and development projects that are funded by EERE offices or aligned with the EERE mission are eligible to use these resources.

On behalf of EERE, NREL coordinates the allocation of its HPC resources each fiscal year. For fiscal year 2017 (FY17), the allocation period runs November 1, 2016, through October 31, 2017. Allocation requests are due August 1, 2016. Resources to be allocated include approximately 21 million node hours (nodes have 16 or 24 cores), 750 terabytes of shared data storage, and up to 1 petabyte of long-term data storage.

Richard Leonard is a corporate turnaround artist. And the National Science Foundation (NSF) in Arlington, Virginia, is betting on him to turn around its troubled National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). Last summer, faced with a projected $80 million cost overrun and a year’s delay in the scheduled 2016 completion, NSF decided to shrink the number of NEON sites from more than 100 to 81 and reduce the scope of the project. That was the final straw in a series of missteps that sealed the fate of the previous contractor, NEON Inc., which was created for the purpose of building and running the observatories.

NSF has given Battelle until mid-June to submit a detailed plan for managing NEON, but Leonard says there won’t be any major surprises. “I do not expect to see any descoping beyond what has already been announced,” Leonard says, “and we’re looking for completion by the end of 2017.”

EarthCube, a landmark initiative to develop new technological and computational capabilities for geosciences research, will be supported by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) under a new agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Created by NSF in 2011, EarthCube aims to help researchers across the geosciences from meteorology to seismology better understand our planet in ways that can strengthen societal resilience to natural events. More than 2,500 EarthCube contributors – including scientists, educators, and information professionals – work together on the creation of a common cyberinfrastructure for researchers to collect, access, analyze, share, and visualize all forms of data and related resources.

Geothermal energy is there for the taking, provided you know where to look and want to invest the time and money to drill into the earth. The process can be complicated, but work being undertaken at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will make it less so.

That's important, because untapped geothermal energy stands ready to fill a need as states and the federal government push to generate more electricity from renewable sources. But adding geothermal-generated electricity to the grid can take years.

Dr. Antonio (Tony) J. Busalacchi was named the next president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) today, following an extensive international search. He joins UCAR from the University of Maryland, where he is professor of atmospheric and oceanic science and director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center. Busalacchi will join UCAR on Aug. 1.

“Tony Busalacchi is an exceptional scientist and leader with a breadth of experience that will be especially important as UCAR extends its role as a leader and advocate for Earth system science,” said Dr. Eric Betterton of the University of Arizona, who chairs the UCAR Board of Trustees.