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NCAR developed and Vaisala commercialized the dropsonde, a meteorological instrument that is deployed from an aircraft into hurricanes to improve both track and intensity forecasts

News & Events

The government’s National Climate Assessment cited human influence as the "dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century." The report affirms that climate change is driven almost entirely by human action, warns of a worst-case scenario where seas could rise as high as eight feet by the year 2100, and details climate-related damage across the United States that is already unfolding as a result of an average global temperature increase of 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit since 1900. When it comes to rapidly escalating levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the report states, “there is no climate analog for this century at any time in at least the last 50 million years.”

National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientist David Fahey in Boulder is one of the lead authors of the study which draws on research from numerous government agencies. The full report is available for download via the The Washington Post.

How will weather change in the future? It's been remarkably difficult to say, but researchers are now making important headway, thanks in part to a groundbreaking new data set at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

Scientists know that a warmer and wetter atmosphere will lead to major changes in our weather. But pinning down exactly how weather — such as thunderstorms, midwinter cold snaps, hurricanes, and mountain snowstorms — will evolve in the coming decades has proven a difficult challenge, constrained by the sophistication of models and the capacity of computers.

A multimillion dollar CU Boulder instrument package expected to help scientists better understand potentially damaging space weather is now slated to launch aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite on Saturday, Nov. 19.

Designed and built by CU Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), the instrument suite known as the Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS) is the first of four identical packages that will fly on four NOAA weather satellites in the coming decade. EXIS will measure energy output from the sun that can affect satellite operations, telecommunications, GPS navigation and power grids on Earth as part of NOAA’s next-generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites-R Series (GOES-R).

he National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has published the U.S. Commerce Department’s (DOC) 2016 Annual Report on Technology Transfer. The document provides an extensive view of the technology transfer activities of DOC’s three bureaus with research laboratories—NIST, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (link is external) (NOAA) and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, which includes the Institute for Telecommunications Sciences (link is external) (ITS).

READ THE REPORT

DOC laboratories work to ensure innovations developed in federal labs make their way to U.S. businesses to bolster their competitiveness in the international marketplace.

CO-LABS Announces Chasing Ice Photographer James Balog to Keynote 2017 Governor's Awards for High-Impact Research


Ninth Annual Event Honors Colorado’s Top Scientists and Engineers
for Projects Having a Significant Impact on Society

September 6, 2017: From the quantum realm of bioscience to the vanguard of atmospheric physics, from the technology advancing new possibilities in manufacturing to crucial new assessments of severe weather – CO-LABS invites fellow champions of science to join the premier scientific research recognition event in Colorado with over 200 researchers, entrepreneurs, business leaders and government officials as we celebrate the exceptional and groundbreaking work of scientists and engineers from Colorado’s federally-funded research labs: the 2017 Governor’s Awards for High Impact Research event on Thursday, October 5, 2017 at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science.