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NCAR developed and Vaisala commercialized the dropsonde, a meteorological instrument that is deployed from an aircraft into hurricanes to improve both track and intensity forecasts

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NREL's Executive Energy Leadership Academy is a nationally renowned program that provides non-technical business, governmental, and community leaders an opportunity to learn about advanced energy technologies, analytical tools, and financing to guide their organizations and communities in energy-related decisions and planning. The Leadership Program is designed for community and industry leaders with an interest in exploring renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, applications, and issues. Participants are required to travel to NREL's main campus in Golden, Colorado, for four multi-day sessions from June through September.

The program provides an in-depth look at solar and wind power, bioenergy and transportation, energy efficient building technologies and energy systems integration.  Course content includes information on performance characteristics of the technologies, economics, and analytical tools. 

NASA’s Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) instrument, designed and built by LASP, launched today from Kourou, French Guiana aboard SES-14, a commercial communications satellite built by Airbus Defence and Space. GOLD will investigate the dynamic intermingling of space and Earth’s uppermost atmosphere—and is the first NASA science mission to fly an instrument as a commercially hosted payload.

Space is not completely empty: It’s teeming with fast-moving charged particles and electric and magnetic fields that guide their motion. At the boundary between Earth’s atmosphere and space, the charged particles— called the ionosphere—co-exist with the upper reaches of the neutral atmosphere, called the thermosphere. The two commingle and influence one another constantly. This interplay—and the role terrestrial weather, space weather and Earth’s own magnetic field each have in it—is the focus of GOLD’s mission. 

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CO-LABS is proud to help connect and promote the diverse and world-class research occurring throughout Colorado. With more than 30 federally-funded laboratories, institutes and organizations including universities and colleges, plus our powerful network of economic development agencies, public sector partners and innovative businesses, our Science Matters newsletter will keep you informed about compelling projects, discoveries and events making Colorado one of the nation's premiere hubs for science and engineering advances.

The government’s National Climate Assessment cited human influence as the "dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century." The report affirms that climate change is driven almost entirely by human action, warns of a worst-case scenario where seas could rise as high as eight feet by the year 2100, and details climate-related damage across the United States that is already unfolding as a result of an average global temperature increase of 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit since 1900. When it comes to rapidly escalating levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the report states, “there is no climate analog for this century at any time in at least the last 50 million years.”

National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientist David Fahey in Boulder is one of the lead authors of the study which draws on research from numerous government agencies. The full report is available for download via the The Washington Post.

How will weather change in the future? It's been remarkably difficult to say, but researchers are now making important headway, thanks in part to a groundbreaking new data set at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

Scientists know that a warmer and wetter atmosphere will lead to major changes in our weather. But pinning down exactly how weather — such as thunderstorms, midwinter cold snaps, hurricanes, and mountain snowstorms — will evolve in the coming decades has proven a difficult challenge, constrained by the sophistication of models and the capacity of computers.