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NCAR developed and Vaisala commercialized the dropsonde, a meteorological instrument that is deployed from an aircraft into hurricanes to improve both track and intensity forecasts

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Adam Savage will be the Colorado School of Mines 2018 Homecoming Distinguished Lecturer on Thursday, September 27.

Savage, an internationally renowned television producer, is best known for his role as the former co-host of the popular television show Mythbusters with Jamie Hyneman. Mythbusters produced more than 250 episodes that aired in more than 100 countries. The program tackled over 1,000 myths and performed nearly 3,000 experiments.

Savage has also worked as a graphic designer, robot builder, welder, machinist, toy maker and a variety of other jobs. He has written for Popular Mechanics, the Wall Street Journal and Wired Magazine, among others. Savage is an honorary lifetime member of the National Science Teachers Association, an honorary member of Sigma Xi and was presented with an honorary doctorate from the Universiteit Twente in the Netherlands for his role in popularizing science and technology. Read his full biography below.

What in the world is geodesy? Geodesy is the study of Earth’s shape, gravity field, and rotation. Geodetic research defines the terrestrial reference frame. Geodetic techniques are used to quantify changes in the Earth’s surface and subsurface; ice sheets and glaciers; and oceans and atmosphere. Geodesy’s broader benefits include help with preparedness and mitigation of hazards and foundational support for space-based operations, navigation, communications, surveying, resource management, and national security. 

The UNAVCO consortium consists of more than 100 US Full Members and over 80 Associate Members (domestic and international). Through their Geodetic Infrastructure and Geodetic Data Services Programs, UNAVCO operates and supports geodetic networks, geophysical and meteorological instruments, a free and open data archive, software tools for data access and processing, cyberinfrastructure management, technological developments, technical support, and geophysical training. The UNAVCO Education and Community Engagement Program provides educational materials, tools and resources for students, teachers, university faculty and the general public. They also provide summer internship experiences for undergraduate students interested in careers in geodesy and geosciences through our RESESS program.

The Core Research Center houses about 2 million feet of core in the general collection of petroleum exploration and development holes as well as in specialized collections. These cores come from 33 states and about 95 percent were donated by petroleum and mining companies, State geological surveys, other Federal agencies, and universities; about 5 percent are special scientific cores drilled by the USGS. In addition, the CRC maintains over 25,000 thin sections taken from cataloged cores and cuttings. Cuttings from over 52,000 wells in 27 States are also housed at the repository. This unique collection of cuttings represents around 240 million feet of drilling at a replacement cost of over $80 billion.

In 1974 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Rocky Mountain Association of geologists, established a permanent free-access core repository in Denver. The purpose of the repository is to rescue rock cores threatened with destruction or disposal, process and store them in an efficient manner, and make them available for observation and sampling by all interested parties. The collection contains full-diameter cores, slabbed cores, and well cuttings.

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have been developing a novel way of measuring laser power. Their device, called the Radiation Pressure Power Meter (RPPM), makes its measurements using the force exerted by the laser light itself.

The NIST team has now fully tested this instrument at the highest power to date – 50 kilowatts (kW) – using a laser at the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF), operated by the U.S. Army and located in New Mexico. By comparison, a 5-kW laser beam can cut through an inch of steel. Traditional techniques for gauging laser power require using an apparatus to absorb all the energy from the beam as heat. Measuring the temperature change allows researchers to calculate the laser’s power.

The American-Made Solar Prize is a $3 million prize competition designed to accelerate and sustain American solar innovation through a series of contests and the development of a diverse and powerful support network that leverages national laboratories, energy incubators, and other resources.

These new challenges seek to lower the barriers U.S.-based innovators face by accelerating the cycles of learning from years to weeks, while helping to create partnerships that connect entrepreneurs to the private sector and the network of DOE's National Laboratories across the nation.